Chickens on Pasture with Lucy 2016

Lucy and the laying hens on pasture

ALL of our chickens at Valley View Farm are pasture raised whether it is a laying hen, a breeding hen, a meat bird or a chick. We do not use antibiotics, growth hormones, or steroids, ever. We do not put lights on our hens to force them to lay on days with short daylight hours–we give them a rest, like nature intended. Our hens are free to range about, looking for forage such as succulent alfalfa or clover, hidden seeds, or tasty worm or insect morsels. They engage in usual bird behavior such as perching, running, foraging, dust bathing, egg laying, cackling, predator evasion, preening, calling, and socializing.

We are a Bee Friendly farm and allow several acres to sit fallow so that pollinators of all types have plenty of habitat. We plant habitat that blooms in the spring, summer, and fall so that pollinators have natural habitat during every possible season. We also have several small ponds for a constant water source and nearby snags for nesting. Even in the chicken yard, we actively increase bee habitat each year. As you can see on the left-hand side of the above picture,

White Plymouth Rocks

White Plymouth Rocks

we allow plants to grow and bloom and leave them in a natural state for wild animals, birds, and pollinators.

We are a Predator Friendly Farm. While we do not like predators attacking our birds, we do not actively attempt to eradicate predators. We protect our flock by using strong fencing around our approximately 3-acre chicken yard, 3 guard dogs to keep predators at bay (Lucy is pictured above walking among the flock), roosters to give the hens a warning when predators are in the area, and secure housing for roosting. See the video on the chicks page to see the amazing instinctive reaction of chicks to a rooster’s warning call (watch to the end of the video). Each of these facets works together to keep our flock safe.

Please see the individual pages on eggs, meat, and chicks for Valley View Farm specifics and general information on each of these products. See Breed pages for information about individual breeds.

Barred Rock and Rhode Island Hens

Barred Rock and Rhode Island Hens